Identification

Thierry BENDA

Animateur spécialisé jeu d'échecs


http://www.fide.com/index.php?format=feed&type=rss

Les derniers articles publiés par la Fédération Internationale des Échecs

Nous affichons seulement les 10 plus récentes actualités (sur 10 articles récents publiés).

WWCC in Khanty-Mansiysk, Semi-final, TB: Kateryna Lagno advances to the Final

wwcc2018

Kateryna Lagno advances to the Final

The tie-break between Kateryna Lagno and Mariya Muzychuk took place on November 17 in Khanty-Mansiysk.

Lagno played White in the first game. In the Open Variation of the Ruy Lopez Muzychuk improved her play compared to the previous game, and White did not get anything real out of the opening. Lagno went for the most principled continuation, trading an exchange for two pawns, but after the queens went off the board, it was White who needed to play accurately to hold the balance. However, Mariya returned the material, transposing to the opposite-colored bishop ending, which turned out difficult for Black. In the time trouble Muzychuk was unable to defend precisely. Lagno won two pawns and then stretched Black's defense to break through her blockade. Muzychuk resigned on move 62.

ART 3463 

White went for the Anti-Berlin setup in the second game. Both players castled queenside. Black's position in the middlegame looked more pleasant, as the white bishop was out of play. Black developed a strong attack against the king, utilizing remote positions of White's pieces. The monarch was forced to run, losing a lot of material along the way. Muzychuk gave up having made her 28th move.

ART 3441

Kateryna won the match 3-1 to qualify for the Final of the Women's World Championship.

ART 3391

Therefore, the fate of the chess crown will be decided in the final match between Ju Wenjun (China) and Kateryna Lagno (Russia). The Chinese player will start with the white pieces.

November 18 is a rest day.

The final match consists of four games with classical time control. If the score after four games is 2-2, a tie-break will ensue on the November 23.




Ju Wenjun advances to Final, Kateryna Lagno and Mariya Muzychuk to play tie-break

The return games of the Semi-final were played on November 16 in Khanty-Mansiysk.

Ju Wenjun had White against Alexandra Kosteniuk and obtained a stable advantage after the opening. In a Hedgehog position White maneuvered slowly, refraining from any breakthroughs almost until the control move, and even then did not follow it up with more energetic action. Black carried out her break on the queenside, which simplified the position considerably. In the subsequent game, the World Champion did not give her opponent a fighting chance, and the game was drawn in a rook ending.

ART 2387
Ju Wenjun won her match 1.5-0.5 and advanced to the Final.
 ART 2428
Kateryna Lagno and Mariya Muzychuk discussed the Open Variation of the Ruy Lopez. Lagno sacrificed a pawn, which seemed to have taken Muzychuk by surprise, as the Ukrainian began to spend a lot of time on her moves. Later White regained material under favorable circumstances, and obtained a pleasant ending with rooks and a bishop. However, the opposite-colored bishops helped Black to hold a draw.

This match will be played out on tie-break tomorrow. Lagno plays White in the first game.

ART 2390
The tie-break will start with two games with rapid time control: 25 minutes plus 10 second per move. If the match is still tied, it will continue with two slow blitz games – 10 minutes plus 10 seconds per move. After that, if the winner is still not determined, two 5+3 blitz games will follow. Finally, those matches that are still tied, will proceed to the Armageddon game.


Ju Wenjun begins Semi-final with a win

 
The Semi-final of the Women's World Championship started in the Ugra Chess Academy on November 15.

The defending World Champion Ju Wenjun had Black against Alexandra Kosteniuk. The players went for the French defense. After the opening, White's position looked promising, as she enjoyed a spatial advantage. However, Black regrouped nicely and won White's overextended a-pawn. Alexandra did not find the best move at the critical moment, and her position deteriorated quickly. However, then the Chinese missed the strongest continuation, which could give her a decisive edge. Further simplifications followed, but the extra pawn remained and eventually proclaimed itself. Ju Wenjun celebrated victory.

ART 2235

Mariya Muzychuk made a draw with Kateryna Lagno. In the Berlin Variation of the Ruy Lopez neither side could claim any advantage. A draw on the move 23 became a logical conclusion of the game.

ART 2185

The return games will be played on November 16. If the matches are drawn after two games, the tie-break will ensue on the next day.





Alexandra Kosteniuk and Mariya Muzychuk advance to Semi-final of Women’s World Championship

The Quarterfinals of the Women's World Championship were concluded on November 14 with two tie-breaks: Alexandra Kosteniuk defeated Anna Muzychuk, and Zhansaya Abdumalik lost to Mariya Muzychuk.

Kosteniuk played the first game with White and obtained a promising position after the opening. Then Black managed to activate her pieces and got a strong counterplay. However, being under heavy time pressure, Muzychuk made several mistakes, giving Kosteniuk a decisive advantage.

ART 1873

Muzychuk started the second game with 1.f4 and got an overwhelming advantage already in the opening. However, with very tenacious defense Alexandra managed to hold a difficult endgame. Looking for possible winning chances, Muzychuk avoided a number of drawing lines, and Black even got an edge. In the end Kosteniuk secured a draw from the position of strength and advanced to the Semi-final with the overall 1.5-0.5 win.

ART 1949-2

Mariya Muzychuk started the tie-break with a Black victory: Abdumalik failed to convince in the opening and then was gradually outplayed in the endgame. In the return game Abdumalik managed to create a complicated battle. Muzychuk sacrificed a piece, but her compensation proved insufficient. With some adventures in the mutual time trouble Abdumalik converted an extra piece, and the players proceeded to "10+10" stage.

 ART 1987

The first 10-minute game was highly dramatic. Zhansaya Abdumalik was defending for the entire game and was very close to a draw. In the endgame R+N vs R she had the right to claim a draw according to the 50-move rule, despite being mated in two moves. However, instead of claiming a draw, Abdumalik resigned.

ART 2014

However, Zhansaya demonstrated her fighting spirit and came back in the second game. The match continued by two more blitz games with faster time control.

Mariya Muzychuk won the first 5+3 blitz as White, then got a much better position as Black and forced a draw by perpetual, thus advancing to the next stage.

ART 2090

Semi-final pairings:

Alexandra Kosteniuk - Ju Wenjun
Mariya Muzychuk - Kateryna Lagno

All players who had advanced to the Semi-final except for the future champion automatically qualified for the 2019 Women's Candidates Tournament.






Ju Wenjun and Kateryna Lagno become the first semi-finalists of Women’s World Championship


The return games of the Quarterfinals were played on November 13 in the Ugra Chess Academy.

Lei Tingjie and Kateryna Lagno entered a complex Ruy Lopez position. According to the Russian, Lei surprised her in the opening, however, Black managed to obtain a harmonious position. The Chinese made a mistake in a time trouble, and was forced to part with material. Lagno gradually overcame the resistance, won the second game as well and advanced to the semi-final.

ART 1617

Ju Wenjun won as Black against Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova. The World Champion found the strongest continuation in the position with opposite side castling, after which White had to give up a pawn. Later White made another mistake and lost even more material, however, in a clearly winning position Ju Wenjun made a mistake herself, giving White significant drawing chances. Still, Tokhirjonova's defense of the resulting endgame was not precise, and Black eventually won this dramatic game. Ju Wenjun also proceeded to the semi-final.

ART 1568

Mariya Muzychuk once again showed her incredible fighting spirit, winning as Black against Zhansaya Abdumalik to equalize the match score. After the opening Muzychuk sacrificed an exchange for a pawn. The bishop pair gave Black sufficient compensation, and Muzychuk gradually outplayed her opponent in the middlegame. Abdumalik had to return the material with interest, but there was no way out for White. This match will continue on tie-break tomorrow.

ART 1579

Anna Muzychuk and Alexandra Kosteniuk made a second draw and will also play the tie-break.

ART 1581

The tie-break will start with two games with rapid time control: 25 minutes plus 10 second per move. If the match is still tied, it will continue with two slow blitz games – 10 minutes plus 10 seconds per move. After that, if the winner is still not determined, two 5+3 blitz games will follow. Finally, those matches that are still tied, will proceed to the Armageddon game.

Tie-break pairings:

A. Kosteniuk - A. Muzychuk

Z. Abdumalik - M. Muzychuk

All players in the Semifinal except the future champion qualify for the 2019 Women's Candidates Tournament








Round 4: Kateryna Lagno and Zhansaya Abdumalik begin with victories


The Quarterfinals of the Women's World Chess Championship started in Khanty-Mansiysk on November 12.

Kateryna Lagno celebrated a convincing victory over Lei Tingjie. The Chinese player went for a very passive opening setup as Black. White gradually developed her advantage and kept pushing even after the exchange of queens, utilizing her strong bishop pair. After white rooks broke to the 7th rank, Black's position became totally lost.

ART 1268-1-2

Former World Champion Mariya Muzychuk, playing White, lost to the 18-year-old Zhansaya Abdumalik. The Ukrainian sacrificed a pawn for the initiative and soon regained the material with interest. However, holding onto the extra pawn was difficult because of the insecure position of her king. Abdumalik utilized a first clear inaccuracy of her opponent, delivering a nice tactical shot. Muzychuk lost a piece and resigned on the 57th move.

ART 1232-1

A. Kosteniuk-A. Muzychuk ended in a draw. In the Sveshnikov/Chelyabinsk variation of the Sicilian, Black sacrificed a pawn, obtaining sufficient counterplay in return. A draw was agreed after series of exchanges.

ART 1246-1

Another rising star of the championship, Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova successfully held as Black against Ju Wenjun. The World Champion had an advantage after the opening, but it somehow evaporated in the middlegame. The resulting rook ending with an extra pawn to White was drawn, and the players signed a peace treaty soon after the control move.

ART 1278

The second games of the round will be played on November 13, the tie-breaks will follow on the next day.

It is to be recalled that all the semifinalists except the future champion will qualify for the upcoming 2019 Women’s Candidates Tournament.

Pairings and results
Photos
Videos


Round 3 of the Women’s World Championship is over

The tie-break of the Women's World Championship was played on November 11 in Khanty-Mansiysk.

The 19-year-old Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova surprisingly defeated the higher rated Valentina Gunina. Tokhirjonova won both rapid games in sharp tactical struggle, which is usually considered Gunina's territory.

ART 1134

Lei Tingjie was stronger than Alisa Galliamova in both 25-minute games and advanced to the Quarterfinal.

ART 1092

Anna Muzychuk and Antoaneta Stefanova drew their first game. In the second game Muzychuk played Black and celebrated a victory, joining her sister at the next stage.

ART 0818

Zhansaya Abdumalik convincingly defeated Jolanta Zawadzka in the first game, and secured a draw from the position of strength in the second game. The player from Kazakhstan is also in the Quarterfinal.

ART 1105-1

Alexandra Kosteniuk outplayed Harika Dronavalli in the first rapid game, but did not manage to hold a slightly worse endgame in the second one. In 10+10 blitz games the Russian was stronger in the first game and confidently drew the second one, thus advancing to the 4th round.

ART 1178

Natalija Pogonina and Kateryna Lagno produced the first Armageddon at the Championship. They made two draws in rapid chess and moved on to blitz. Long blitz games brought another two draws. In 5+3 games the players exchanged blows: Natalija lost the first game, but showed her famous fighting spirit and came back in the second one. In the “sudden death” game Kateryna Lagno took White and managed to outplay her opponent in the endgame.

ART 1193

Quarterfinal pairings:

Ju Wenjun - Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova
Mariya Muzychuk - Zhansaya Abdumalik
Kateryna Lagno - Lei Tingjie
Alexandra Kosteniuk - Anna Muzychuk

Official website  


Two quarterfinalists are determined, six tie-breaks are ahead

The return games of the third round of the Women's World Championship were played on November 10.

The reigning World Champion Ju Wenjun was first to advance to the Quarterfinals, drawing the second game with her 22-year-old compatriot Zhai Mo and thus securing the overall match win.

ART 0798

Former World Champion Mariya Muzychuk eliminated the most sensational player of the first two rounds, the 18-year-old Mobina Alinasab. In the second game of the match the Ukrainian got an advantage after the opening, gradually improved her position and won a good fighting game, winning the match 1.5 to 0.5.

ART 0800-1

Valentina Gunina managed to level the score against Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova, and the outcome of the match will be decided on the tie-break tomorrow. According to the Russian, this will be her first tie-break ever.

ART 0937-1

The 18-year-old Zhansaya Abdumalik, who plays her first World Championship, also succeeded in coming back in her match against Jolanta Zawadzka. The fight will be continued on the tie-break.

ART 0758

After a lengthy struggle Antoaneta Stefanova squeezed a victory over Anna Muzychuk, thus tying the match score and advancing to the tie-breaks.

ART 0803

The classical part of the matches Harika-Kosteniuk, Lagno-Pogonina, and Galliamova-Lei Tingjie ended in draws, rapid and possibly blitz games to follow tomorrow.

ART 0785-1

The tie-break will start with two games with rapid time control: 25 minutes plus 10 second per move. If the match is still tied, it will continue with two slow blitz games – 10 minutes plus 10 seconds per move. After that, if the winner is still not determined, two 5+3 blitz games will follow. Finally, those matches that are still tied, will proceed to the Armageddon game.

Tie-break pairings:

Muzychuk Anna - Stefanova Antoaneta
Pogonina Natalija - Lagno Kateryna
Tokhirjonova Gulrukhbegim - Gunina Valentina
Galliamova Alisa - Lei Tingjie
Kosteniuk Alexandra - Harika Dronavalli
Abdumalik Zhansaya - Zawadzka Jolanta

Official website  



Round 3 begins in Khanty-Mansiysk

The first games of the Round 3 of the Women's World Championship were played in the Ugra Chess Academy on November 9.

Antoaneta Stefanova suffered an opening disaster against Anna Muzychuk. According to the Ukrainian, facing the Petroff defense was rather surprising. “I am not sure whether Antoaneta ever played this opening before, and she clearly was not ready for the variation I chose. Her 9th move was inaccurate and allowed me to seize space and obtain a good game”, said Anna afterwards.

Already around the move 15 Black was in a serious trouble, and White successfully utilized advantages of her position. The former World Champion resigned on the move 26, unable to defend against mating threats.

ART 0565

Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova produced a mild sensation beating Valentina Gunina. Their game was double-edged, but in the mutual time trouble the Russian probably overestimated her chances, refusing a number of drawing options, made a fatal mistake and lost very quickly.

ART 0441

Jolanta Zawadzka surprised Zhansaya Abdumalik in the opening and got a promising position as White. The grandmaster from Poland produced a quality strategic game, won an exchange and eventually celebrated a win.

ART 0466-1

Ju Wenjun had Black against Zhai Mo. The younger Chinese player miscalculated a combination in the middlegame, lost an exchange, and was unable to survive.

Mobina Alinasab obtained a serious advantage after the opening against Mariya Muzychuk, and methodically applied pressure against Black's position. The game transposed to a queen ending with an extra pawn to White, however, when Alinasab was on a brink of a victory, she committed a big mistake, allowing Black to survive with a rather miraculous perpetual check.

ART 0482

Alexandra Kosteniuk held as Black against Harika Dronavalli, defending a difficult endgame without a pawn. The games Galliamova-Lei Tingjie and Pogonina-Lagno also ended peacefully.

ART 0452

The second games of the round will be played on Saturday, November 10. The tied matches will proceed to the tie-breaks on November 11.

Official website  



16 players continue fighting for the chess crown

The tie-breaks of the second round of the World Women's Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk were played on November 8. Once again all matches except one were decided in rapid chess.

The Russians Kateryna Lagno and Alexandra Kosteniuk won their matches against Hoang Thanh Trang and Ni Shiqun respectively with the same score – 2-0.

ART 0326

Zhansaya Abdumalik also won both games against Zhao Xue; in the second game the Chinese player lost on time in a drawn position, but it did not affect the outcome of the match.

Antoaneta Stefanova defeated Dinara Saduakassova in the first game, and secured the match win with a draw from the position of strength in the second game.

ART 0228

Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova defeated the former World Champion Tan Zhongyi in the first game and held the balance in the second game.

Harika Dronavalli missed a victory in the first game with Bela Khotenashvili, but showed strong character, winning the second game and a match.

ART 0199-1

The match between Mariya Muzychuk and Ekaterina Atalik was quite dramatic. Atalik probably missed some chances in the first game, which ended in a draw, and suffered an opening disaster in the second game. Muzychuk won and advanced to the third round.

Natalija Pogonina succesfully defended two difficult positions against Zhu Jiner in rapid chess, and then crushed the opponent in the first 10-minute game. In the second game the Chinese fought desperately, but was unable to get realistic winning chances, and eventually lost.

ART 0359

Round 3 matches:

Zhai Mo - Ju Wenjun
Jolanta Zawadzka – Zhansaya Abdumalik
Natalija Pogonina – Kateryna Lagno
Anna Muzychuk – Antoaneta Stefanova
Harika Dronavalli – Alexandra Kosteniuk
Alisa Galliamova - Lei Tingjie
Mobina Alinasab - Mariya Muzychuk
Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova – Valentina Gunina

Official website  




Favorites keep leaving Khanty-Mansiysk

The second games of the second round of the Women’s World Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk were played on November 7.

Having defeated Anastasia Bodnaruk in both games, Anna Muzychuk became the first qualifier to the third round.

Mobina Alinasab continues to surprise chess fans: although her position after the opening looked rather suspicious, the Iranian outplayed Monika Socko in the middlegame and won the match 2-0.

ART 1830

However, the main surprise of the round occurred in the match between Humpy Koneru and Jolanta Zawadzka – the grandmaster from Poland, playing Black, defeated the rating favorite and advanced to the third round.

ART 1967

Lei Tingjie was stronger than Nana Dzagnidze in the second game of their match and also moved on to the third round.

Aleksandra Goryachkina failed to strike back in the Russian derby against Alisa Galliamova. The more experienced Galliamova had the initiative throughout the game and won convincingly.

ART 1732

Ju Wenjun successfully defended a difficult position against Irina Krush and secured the overall victory – 1.5 to 0.5.

Valentina Gunina won a complicated game as Black against Anna Ushenina, and advanced to the next stage, winning her match 1.5 to 0.5.

ART 1733

Zhai Mo won both games against Nino Batsiashvili and joined a group of her compatriots in the third round.

Ekaterina Atalik was close to defeating Mariya Muzychuk for the second time in a row, however, she made a mistake in a very sharp position and lost. This match will be continued tomorrow on the tie-break.

Natalija Pogonina also managed to level the score against Zhu Jiner. The winner of their match will also be determined in speed chess.

ART 1696

The following matches featured two draws and will be decided on the tie-break: Lagno-Hoang Thanh Trang, Khotenashvili-Harika, Tokhirjonova-Tan Zhongyi, Abdumalik-Zhao Xue, Stefanova-Saduakassova, and Kosteniuk-Ni Shiqun.

ART 1784

The tie-break will start with two games with rapid time control: 25 minutes plus 10 second per move. If the match is still tied, it will continue with two slow blitz games – 10 minutes plus 10 seconds per move. After that, if the winner is still not determined, two 5+3 blitz games will follow. Finally, those matches that are still tied, will proceed to the Armageddon game.

Tie-break pairings:

Hoang Thanh Trang - Lagno Kateryna
Kosteniuk Alexandra - Ni Shiqun
Muzychuk Mariya - Atalik Ekaterina
Tokhirjonova Gulrukhbegim - Tan Zhongyi
Harika Dronavalli - Khotenashvili Bela
Saduakassova Dinara - Stefanova Antoaneta
Zhu Jiner - Pogonina Natalija
Zhao Xue - Abdumalik Zhansaya

Official website  


Women's World Championship, Round 2: Surprises keep coming

The first games of the second round of the Women's World Championship were played in the Ugra Chess Academy on November 6.

The 15-year-old Zhu Jiner continues to surprise chess fans. The Chinese started the second round with a convincing victory over the Russian champion Natalija Pogonina.

Mobina Alinasab produced another upset, winning as Black against Monika Socko. The Iranian outplayed her experienced opponent in the opening and developed her advantage in the middlegame. Socko's position was already precarious when she blundered a knight and resigned immediately.

ART 1238

The World Champion Ju Wenjun played a textbook game against Irina Krush, flawlessly converting a spatial advantage in a rook ending into a win.

ART 1394

Nino Batsiashvili had a promising position against Zhai Mo, however, she chose a wrong moment for a central break, and lost two pawns. The Chinese converted the material advantage confidently.

Anastasia Bodnaruk had White against Anna Muzychuk. In the opening the Russian sacrificed an exchange, however, the compensation proved insufficient, and the Ukrainian gradually overplayed her opponent.

ART 1367

Alisa Galliamova showed deep opening preparation against Aleksandra Goryachkina and obtained a very promising position. With series of timely executed tactical blows White won a piece and then the game.

Ekaterina Atalik outsmarted Mariya Muzychuk in a complicated minor piece ending. The former World Champion from Ukraine had to give up a piece for Black's passed pawn. During the concluding stage of the game Ekaterina showed her skill in checkmating with a knight and bishop.

ART 1587

The following games were drawn: Abdumalik-Zhao Xue, Zawadzka-Koneru, Dzagnidze-Lei Tingjie, Gunina-Ushenina, Kosteniuk-Ni Shiqun, Tokhirdjonova-Tan Zhongyi, Stefanova-Saduakassova, Khotenashvili-Harika, and Lagno-Hoang Thanh Trang.

  ART 1453

The return games will be played on November 7.

Official website  

 


Round 1 of Women’s World Championship Completed in Khanty-Mansiysk

There were 11 tie-breaks on November 5: Lei Tingjie-Gara, Sadaukassova-Matnadze, Krush-Gaponenko, Zhukova-Ni Shiqun, Atalik-Cori, Foisor-Stefanova, Harika-Khukhashvili, Vera Gutierrez-Bodnaruk, Padmini-Abdumalik, Nakhbayeva-Galliamova, and Hoang Thanh Trang-Danielian.

Only one match out of 11 was not decided in rapid chess.

Dinara Saduakassova defeated Ana Matnadze with the perfect 2-0 score. Lei Tingjie won against Anita Gara in a similarly convincing way. Inna Gaponenko lost the first game to Irina Krush, and was unable to come back in the second one, thus losing the rapid match 0-2.

ART 0642

Antoaneta Stefanova also won 2-0 against Sabina-Francesca Foisor. Deysi Cori was unable to hold Ekaterina Atalik: the Turkish player won 2-0.

Anastasia Bodnaruk defeated Sabrina Vega Gutierrez in the first rapid game. The Russian had winning chances in the second game as well, but it ended in a draw, which allowed Bodnaruk to advance to the next round.

ART 0567

Harika Dronavalli and Sopiko Khukhashvili ended their first game peacefully. The second game started calmly, but the endgame was head-spinning and full of mutual errors. After the dust has settled, the Indian took the upper hand and advanced to the second round.

ART 0621

Zhansaya Abdumalik and Rout Padmini drew their first game, but in the second one the player from Kazakhstan was stronger and proceeded to the next stage.

Hoang Thanh Trang started her tie-break against Elina Danielian with a win, and solidified her success with a draw in the second game.

Guliskhan Nakhbayeva dramatically lost to Alisa Galliamova in the first rapid game, and did not manage to equalize in the second one. A repeated Russian champion moves on to the next stage.

ART 1122

Only Natalia Zhukova and Ni Shiqun made two draws in rapid games, and their match advanced to slow blitz games (10+10). The struggle in the first game was very tense, but the Chinese player managed to equalize, then to seize the initiative, and eventually won the game. In the second game she held a draw from the position of strength and won the match.

ART 1169

Round 2 pairings:

Ju Wenjun – Krush, Zawadzka – Koneru, Lagno – Hoang Thanh Trang, Bodnaruk – A. Muzychuk, Kosteniuk – Ni Shiqun, Galliamova – Goryachkina, M. Muzychuk – Atalik, Tokhirjonova – Tan Zhongyi, Gunina – Ushenina, Socko – Alinasab, Dzagnidze – Lei Tingjie, Khotenashvili – Harika, Stefanova – Saduakassova, Zhu Jiner – Pogonina, Abdumalik – Zhao Xue, Zhai Mo – Batsiashvili.

 
Official website  


21 players advance to the second round of Women’s World Championship in Khanty-Mansiysk

The second games of the first round of the Women's World Championship were played in the Ugra Chess Academy on November 4.

The following players advanced to the 2nd round with the perfect score: Ju Wenjun, Anna and Mariya Muzychuk, Kateryna Lagno, Humpy Koneru, Alexandra Kosteniuk, Nana Dzagnidze, Nino Batsiashvili, Zhao Xue, Zhai Mo, and Zhu Jiner. The last two players defeated the higher rated Olga Girya and Lela Javakhishvili respectively.

ART 0059

Valentina Gunina, Tan Zhongyi, Monika Socko, Jolanta Zawadzka, Aleksandra Goryachkina, Natalija Pogonina, Anna Ushenina, and Bela Khotenashvili won their matches 1.5 to 0.5. Alina Kashlinskaya did not manage to come back after the defeat yesterday, and Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova also advanced to the next round with a draw in their second game. Mobina Alinasab caused the biggest upset of the championship so far, holding to a draw against Elisabeth Paehtz and thus advancing to the second round.

ART 1199

The rest of the players will face the tie-breaks on November 5:

Lei Tingjie-Gara, Saduakassova-Matnadze, Krush-Gaponenko, Zhukova-Ni Shiqun, Atalik-Cori, Foisor-Stefanova, Harika-Khukhashvili, Vera Gutierrez-Bodnaruk, Padmini-Abdumalik, Nakhbayeva-Galliamova, and Hoang Thanh Trang-Danielian.

ART 1281

The tie-break will start with two games with rapid time control: 25 minutes plus 10 second per move. If the match is still tied, it will continue with two slow blitz games – 10 minutes plus 10 seconds per move. After that, if the winner is still not determined, two 5+3 blitz games will follow. Finally, those matches that are still tied, will proceed to the Armageddon game.

Official website   



First games of Women's World Championship played in Khanty-Mansiysk

Prior to the start of the first round, the official flag of FIDE was raised in front of the Ugra Chess Academy. This very flag was presented to Ugra Chess Federation President Vassily Filipenko during the closing ceremony of the Chess Olympiad in Batumi. As Khanty-Mansiysk will host the next Chess Olympiad in 2020, for the next two years the flag of FIDE will remain in the capital of Ugra.

ART 0802

Varvara Tsaregorodtseva, the 9-year-old student of the Ugra Chess Academy, U9 champion of Ugra among girls, made a symbolic first move in the game between Zhai Mo from China and the Ugra representative Olga Girya. The result of this game, however, was disappointing for local fans, as Olga Girya lost in sharp struggle.

ART 0828

Most rating favorites won their games, however, there was a couple of upsets. Elisabeth Pazhtz lost as White to Mobina Alinasab, a player rated significantly lower than the German. Maili-Jade Ouellet made a draw with Aleksandra Goryachkina.

ART 1168-2

A number of decisive games among closely rated players was quite high. Gulrukhbegim Tokhirjonova defeated Alina Kashlinskaya, Anna Ushenina won against Lilit Mkrtchian, Ni Shiqun lost to Natalia Zhukova, Monika Socko proved stronger than Yuliya Shvayger, and Lela Javakhishvili lost to Zhu Jineer.

ART 1055

The following games ended in a draw: Krush-Gaponenko, Vega Gutierrez-Bodnaruk, Foisor-Stefanova, Saduakassova-Matnadze, Harika-Khukhashvili, Vo Thi Kim Phung-Khotenashvili, Guseva-Zawadzka, Padmini-Abdumalik, Atalik-Cori, Hoang Thanh Trang-Danielian, Nakhbayeva-Galliamova, and Lei Tingjie-Gara.

ART 1044

The second games of the first round are played on Sunday, November 4. Any match that ends 1- 1 will proceed to a tie-break on the next day.

Official website  



FIDE Women’s World Championship Officially Opened in Khanty-Mansiysk

On November 2, the FIDE Women's World Championships started in Khanty-Mansiysk. The Opening Ceremony of the event was held in the Concert and theater center “Ugra-Classic”.

ART 0347

Guests and participants had a chance to enjoy fairy-tale organ melodies performed by Elena Kozemirenko before the official part of the ceremony.

The first part of the ceremony started with the presentation of 28 participating countries.

In the official part of the ceremony, Chief Federal Inspector of Ugra Dmitry Kuzmenko and FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich greeted players and guests.

ART 0474

Dmitry Kuzmenko read out a greeting letter from the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin.

Arkady Dvorkovich greeted everyone in Khanty-Mansiysk and thanked the Government of Ugra and its Governor Natalya Komarova in person, organizers, the Ugra Chess Federation, and all the people involved for hosting this event on the highest level. He also reminded the players that the format of the Women’s World Championship cycle would be changed.

ART 0326

“I will make sure that in the future the Women's World Championship cycle will be a standard one, and three semi-finalists except for the winner will qualify for the Candidates Tournament which will determine the challenger for the next World Championship Match with higher prizes and better conditions. I would like to reassure you that we will pay more attention to the women's chess in the future. So everyone could enjoy chess in all its beauty as it is art, sport, and science”, says Arkady Dvorkovich.

After his speech, FIDE President declared the Championship open.

ART 0590

Before the start of the entertaining part of the ceremony the drawing of lots was carried out. The Championship’s Chief Arbiter Igor Bolotinsky invited the top seed of the Women's World Championship, the reigning world champion Ju Wenjun of China, who picked a black pawn. It means that the players with odd starting numbers will start the first game of the first round with the black pieces.

The procedure of drawing lots was followed by bright and spectacular performances of singers and musicians.

After the Opening Ceremony, a short press briefing with Governor of Ugra Natalya Komarova and FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich was organized.

The first round of Championship starts on November 3 in the Ugra Chess Academy.

There shall be five rounds of matches, comprising two games per round, with the winners progressing to the next round. The 6th (final) round shall be played over four games. If the score is equal after regular games of each match, tie-break games shall be played.

Schedule: November 2 - Players Meeting / Opening Ceremony, November 3-5 - Round 1, November 6-8 - Round 2, November 9-11 - Round 3, November 12-14 - Round 4 (Quarterfinals), November 15-17 - Round 5 (Semi-final), November 18 - Free day, November 19-23 - Round 6 (Final), November 23 - Closing Ceremony.

Prize fund is USD 450,000.



ART 0327

ART 0451

ART 0698

Round 4: Kateryna Lagno and Zhansaya Abdumalik begin with victories

FIDE WCCM Game 6: The World Champion Escapes.

ABC 5140 top

FIDE WCCM Game 6: The World Champion Escapes.

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12    Score   
 Carlsen  alt ½ ½ ½ ½  ½  ½              3
 Caruana  alt ½ ½  ½   ½ ½   ½             3

Magnus Carlsen, the World Champion, was on the ropes in Game 6 of the title match in London. But in a long endgame, Fabiano Caruana, the challenger, could find no way to break down Carlsen’s defenses and he was finally able to escape with a draw.

r6 1

The result left the match tied the halfway point at three points apiece; all six games in the contest have ended in draws.

The best-of-12 game match has a prize fund of a million euros (about $1.1 million), with 60 percent for the winner. Each win is worth a point and each draw a half point. The first player to reach 6.5 points is declared the winner. (If the match should be tied after 12 games, the players will proceed to a series of tie-breakers and the winner of the match would receive 55 percent of the prize fund).

r6 4

In Game 6, Carlsen, who is from Norway, had White and started with 1 e4. It was Carlsen’s third game with White and, in all three games, he has chosen a different opening move. Caruana, who is American, replied 1 … e5 and after Carlsen continued 2 Nf3, Caruana chose the Petroff, or Russian, Defense. That was not a surprise as Caruana had employed the defense with great success when he won the Candidates tournament in Berlin earlier this year to qualify for the title match. 

r6 3

The game continued down an obscure branch of the Petroff that Carlsen had doubtless studied carefully. Caruana demonstrated he also was well prepared as he navigated some of the intricacies with no problem.

After 15 moves, the position was symmetrical and the game seemed headed for a draw, which also was no surprise, as the Petroff has long had a reputation of being drawish. The game continued, however, partly because there is a rule in the match that games must be at least 30 moves, and also because neither player had any interest in agreeing to an early peace.

On Move 22, Carlsen made what turned out to be a small, but subtle error by positioning his light-squared bishop on a file that could be opened. Caruana was able to gain time to develop his rooks by attacking the bishop and that allowed him to take over the initiative.

Carlsen was in no immediate danger, but Caruana had nagging pressure against White’s position. By Move 34, the players had reached an endgame in which each had his bishop pair and a knight and a set of six pawns.

Just after the first time control at Move 40, Carlsen made another small error and was forced to trade one of his remaining pieces for three of Caruana’s pawns. Nominally, that is about an even trade, but, at the tail end of the sequence, Caruana was able to win another of Carlsen’s pawns.

Carlsen was clearly in trouble, but Caruana only had two pawns left and if Carlsen could trade them, the game would be a draw. The exchange of one pawn was impossible to prevent, but Carlsen could not easily get to the second. Computer evaluations showed a clear edge for Caruana.

Computers do not understand endgames very well, however. And Carlsen is one of the greatest endgame virtuoso’s in history. He found a plan that involved sacrificing his last queenside pawn to allow his king to infiltrate Caruana’s king side. Though Carlsen’s king now had almost no room to maneuver, it could support the advance of his h pawn if Caruana tried to go after Carlsen’s f pawn to clear the path for his own remaining f pawn.

For nearly 20 moves, Caruana tried to outflank Carlsen, but it was not possible. Carlsen had built a fortress. The game was drawn on Move 80, after six-and-a-half hours of play. A curious facet of the match is that Black has had equal chances or an edge in every one of the games; neither player’s strategy with White has been effective.

r6 2

FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2018 is also supported by PhosAgro, a leading chemical company as the Official Strategic Partner; Kaspersky Lab as the Official Cybersecurity Partner; PRYTEK as Technology Transfer Partner; S.T. Dupont as Official Writing Instrument; Isklar as the official mineral water of the Championship Match; Unibet as the Official Betting Partner.

r6 5

Game 7 is on Sunday at 3 PM local, or GMT, time.

Caruana will once again have Black. The way that the match has unfolded, that may be an advantage.






Game 4: The Defense Holds Again

Game 4 of the World Championship on Tuesday ended as the first three had – with a draw. It was also the shortest game of the match, lasting 34 moves and three hours.

1 ABC 9749
As in Game 3, neither player made any obvious or big error. Indeed, Magnus Carlsen, the Norwegian World Champion, who had White, chose the English (1 c4), an opening that generally does not put much pressure on Black. After Fabiano Caruana, the American challenger, replied with 1 … e5 (essentially the Sicilian Defense with colors reversed), he had little trouble developing his pieces or establishing equal chances.

By Move 20, the queens, both sets of knights and the light-squared bishops had all been exchanged and though there was some imbalance in the pawn structure, neither player had particularly good prospects for a breakthrough. They agreed to a draw soon after.

The match now is tied at two points apiece.

2 ABC 9749
The match is best-of-12 games with a prize fund of a million euros (about $1.1 million), with 60 percent for the winner. Each win is worth a point and each draw a half point. The first player to reach 6.5 points will be the winner. (If the match should be tied after 12 games, the players will proceed to a series of tie-breaker games.)

The match is organized under the auspices of the World Chess Federation, or FIDE, the game’s governing body, and World Chess, the official organizer of the World Championship cycle.

The venue for the event is in central London at the College in Holborn, an historic, Victorian-style building. Fans can watch online at Worldchess.com, the official site of the championship.

The match’s sponsors include PhosAgro, a giant Russian-based international fertilizer company; Kaspersky Lab, one of the world’s top information security companies; S.T. Depont, a leading French luxury goods manufacturer; Prytek, a Russian venture capital company specializing in technology and financial services; and Unibet, an online gambling operator that is in more than 100 countries.

After a great deal of excitement in Game 1, which lasted 115 moves and which Caruana nearly lost, the match has settled down, with neither player having any significant winning chances in the last three games.

3 ABC 9749
That is not really a surprise.

The players in World Championship matches are always incredibly well prepared and they are also reluctant to take big risks because falling behind in such a match is very dangerous.

Carlsen and Caruana are also fairly evenly matched, judging both by their rankings, Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, and the difference in their ratings – three points, which is only a whisker.

As the match progresses, the tension will mount. Normally, that would favor the champion, who not only has more match experience, but also would have an advantage in the tie-breakers, as they are played at faster time controls, at which he excels and at which Caruana is not nearly as proficient.

4 ABC 9749
However, in the 2016 title match against Sergey Karjakin of Russia, it was Carlsen who cracked first as he lost his patience and overpressed in Game 8, eventually losing. He had to fight back in Game 10 to tie the match before prevailing in the tie-breakers. Has Carlsen learned from that experience? Time will tell.

Wednesday is a rest day. The match resumes with Game 5 on Thursday at 3 PM local, or GMT, time.






Game 3: An error-free day.

After three games of the World Championship, neither player has made a dent in the other’s armor. All the games have ended in draws.

CC 1

On Monday, in Game 3, Fabiano Caruana, the American challenger, had White for the second time in the match and, for the second time, he opened with 1 e4. As he had in Game 1, Magnus Carlsen, the World Champion from Norway, replied with the Sicilian Defense (1 … c5) and Caruana again replied with the Rossolimo Variation (3 Bb5). The players repeated the same first five moves before Carlsen deviated first by moving his queen instead of his king knight.

The change was subtle and did not result in any major shift in the dynamic balance of the position. Indeed, unlike in the first game, when Caruana got into trouble, in this game he was never in any real danger. But neither was Carlsen. As the game proceeded and pieces and pawns were gradually exchanged, chances remained equal as neither player made any mistake.

CC 2

In the end, Caruana sacrificed his remaining piece, a knight, to eliminate the last pawn that Carlsen had any chance to promote to a queen. With no winning chances for either side, the players agreed to a draw after 49 moves.

The match now is tied at 1.5 points apiece.

The match is best-of-12 games with a prize fund of a million euros (about $1.1 million), with 60 percent for the winner. Each win is worth a point and each draw a half point. The first player to reach 6.5 points will be the winner. (If the match should be tied after 12 games, the players will proceed to a series of tie-breaker games.)

CC 3

The match is organized under the auspices of the World Chess Federation, or FIDE, the game’s governing body, and World Chess, the official organizer of the World Championship cycle.

The venue for the event is in central London at the College in Holborn, an historic, Victorian-style building. Fans can watch online at Worldchess.com, the official site of the championship.

The match’s sponsors include PhosAgro, a giant Russian-based international fertilizer company; Kaspersky Lab, one of the world’s top information security companies; S.T. Depont, a leading French luxury goods manufacturer; Prytek, a Russian venture capital company specializing in technology and financial services; and Unibet, an online gambling operator that is in more than 100 countries.

Though the match is only three games old, one theme has already emerged: Black is having no trouble equalizing out of the opening. (Indeed, the player with Black has, if anything, had an advantage in each game.)

In this respect, Caruana may already be a bit worried about his match strategy as he has avoided mixing things up with Carlsen on the White side of a Sicilian Defense by playing 3 d4, the most popular third move. Though the Rossolimo Variation (3 Bb5) certainly holds dangers for Black, it may be necessary for Caruana to enter the myriad complications of the main lines of the Sicilian after 3 d4 if he hopes to crack Carlsen’s defense.

Or Caruana may have to resort to a different first move altogether, such as 1 d4. His opening choice in Game 5, when he again has White will be very interesting.

CC 4

In the meantime, there is Game 4, which is Tuesday at 3 PM local, or GMT, time.





Game 2: A Fair Result

Two games into the World Championship and neither player in the title match has managed to score a win, but both have now been under pressure.

Saturday, in Game 2, Fabiano Caruana, the American challenger, who had Black, emerged from the opening with a small but distinct advantage because the pawns of Magnus Carlsen, the Norwegian World Champion, were far advanced and difficult to defend. But Carlsen was able to force an endgame in which each player only had a rook and all the remaining pawns were on one side of the board, making Carlsen’s defensive task much easier.

ABC 8315

After the first time control and 49 moves, the players agreed to the draw.

The match is tied at a point apiece.

The best-of-12 game match has a prize fund of a million euros (about $1.1 million), with 60 percent for the winner. Each win is worth a point and each draw a half point. The first player to reach 6.5 points is declared the winner. (If the match should be tied after 12 games, the players will proceed to a series of tie-breakers and the winner of the match would receive 55 percent of the prize fund.)

The match is organized under the auspices of the World Chess Federation, or FIDE, the game’s governing body, and World Chess, the official organizer of the World Championship cycle.

The venue for the event is in central London at The College in Holborn, an historic, Victorian-style building. Fans can watch online at Worldchess.com, the official site of the championship.

The match’s sponsors include PhosAgro, a giant, Russian-based international fertilizer company; Kaspersky Lab, one of the world’s top information security companies; S.T. Dupont, a leading French luxury goods manufacturer; Prytek, a Russian venture capital company specializing in technology and financial services; and Unibet, an online gambling operator that operates in more than 100 countries.

ABC 8334

The opening in Game 2 was a Queen’s Gambit Declined, with Carlsen choosing to play 5 Bf4 rather than the slightly more traditional 5 Bg5. It is an opening that he has used before and with great success, so it could not have been a surprise to Caruana.

Indeed, with 6 … c5, Caruana attacked Carlsen’s center. This is a known and sharp line , but Caruana proved better prepared with Carlsen consuming much time in solving new problems. Caruana soon established an edge by breaking up Carlsen’s queen side pawns.

A series of exchanges followed that saddled Carlsen with broken pawns on the kingside and a far advanced, but weak d pawn that would inevitably fall. But the reduced material, and Carlsen’s lead in development, allowed him to avoid real trouble.

ABC 8602a

Though Caruana had an extra pawn, he agreed to a draw after 49 moves. He probably saw no reason to try to repeat the 115-move marathon of Game 1, when Carlsen had an extra pawn and tried to squeeze out a victory in a position that offered no real hope for success.

There is a rest day on Sunday before the match resumes with Game 3 on Monday at 3 PM local, or GMT, time.



Game 1: A Near Miss for Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen, the World Champion, nearly got the perfect result – a win – on Friday in Game 1 of his title match against Fabiano Caruana. But at several critical moments, Carlsen missed his best moves, allowing Caruana to eke out a draw.

Though the result was a disappointment for Carlsen, it was anything but that for fans. The game stretched 115 moves and nearly six hours before the players split the point.

ABC 7330

Carlsen, 27, who is from Norway, is making his third title defense, having captured the crown in 2013, when he beat Viswanathan Anand of India. Caruana, 26, who is American, is playing his first match for the title. Carlsen is ranked No. 1 in the world, while Caruana is No. 2. It is the first time since 1990, when Garry Kasparov faced Anatoly Karpov, that Nos. 1 and 2 have faced off for the undisputed title. The match, which is being held in central London at The College in Holborn, an historic, Victorian-style building, is organized under the auspices of the World Chess Federation, or FIDE, the game’s governing body, and World Chess, the official organizer of the World Championship cycle.

The match is being televised on Worldchess.com, the official site of the championship.

The best-of-12 game match has a prize fund of a million euros (about $1.1 million), with 60 percent for the winner. Each win is worth a point and each draw a half point. The first player to reach 6.5 points is declared the winner. (If the match should be tied after 12 games, the players will proceed to a series of tie-breakers and the winner of the match would receive 55 percent of the prize fund.)

The match’s sponsors include PhosAgro, a giant, Russian-based international fertilizer company; Kaspersky Lab, one of the world’s top information security companies; S.T. Dupont, a leading French luxury goods manufacturer; Prytek, a Russian venture capital company specializing in technology and financial services; and Unibet, an online gambling operator that operates in more than 100 countries.

The match has received worldwide media exposure, with articles in The Guardian, the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, and ESPN, among others.

Carlsen and Caruana are well acquainted, having played each other at classical, or slow, time controls almost three dozen times. They know each other’s style; they have no secrets. But, in World Championship matches, where the pressure is at the highest level, every small edge counts, and so anything a player can do to surprise his opponent is significant. Other than playing psychological games, or resorting to gamesmanship, which neither Carlsen or Caruana is known to do, the only real way to surprise the opponent is with opening strategy and opening choices.

ABC 7417

In Round 1, the edge almost certainly went to Carlsen. Against 1 e4 by Caruana, who had White, Carlsen chose the Sicilian Defense, perhaps the most double-edged reply. It has not been a standard part of Carlsen's repertoire for some time and is a provocative choice in such a high-stakes match.

(The opening choice may also indicate that Carlsen prepared for the match with Maxime Vachier-Lagrave of France, a noted Sicilian expert, who is a month older than Carlsen. The members of each player’s team of seconds is usually a well-guarded secret because it can tip the opponent off about the pre-match preparation.)

After Carlsen played 2… Nc6, perhaps indicating perhaps that he wanted to enter the Sveshnikov Variation, Caruana countered with 3 Bb5 -- the Rossolimo Variation, which Anand used against Boris Gelfand during their 2012 title match. Caruana’s opening choice was possibly meant to avoid the maze of complications of the Sveshnikov, but it backfired as Carlsen gradually took control.

As the first time-control approached on Move 40, Caruana's time was dwindling rapidly and his position was under pressure as Carlsen managed to open up the file in front of Caruana’s king. Caruana decided that his best chance lay in a flight of his king to the other side of the board, but, according to the various computer engines analyzing the position, that was a mistake. Carlsen could have then swung his queen to the other side of the board and picked off one or two of Caruana’s pawns. In the endgame, his queenside pawns, supported by his dark-square bishop, would have been dangerous, if not lethal. The computers evaluated Carlsen having a strategic advantage of the equivalent of about two pawns – more than enough to be decisive at this level of competition.

775255148GS038 First Move C

But Carlsen did not see the strategy and continued to concentrate on the kingside. On his 40th move, he made a fateful decision – he exchanged his dangerous passed f pawn for Caruana’s c pawn. Though Carlsen retained an advantage, it was now minimal.

After the further exchange of Caruana’s knight for Carlsen’s bishop, as well as a pair of pawns, the players ended up in a rook-and-pawn endgame where Carlsen’s chances to win were insufficient, despite having an extra pawn. Carlsen, as is his habit, continued to press for another 60 moves before he agreed to a draw. It was one of the longest games in World Championship history, eclipsed by one of 124 moves in 1978 between Karpov and Viktor Korchnoi, and another of 122 moves between Carlsen and Anand in 2014.

Game 2 is Saturday and starts at 3 PM local, or GMT, time.

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12    Score   
 Carlsen  alt ½                       0.5
 Caruana  alt ½                       0.5


Photos are available in the


Opening Ceremony of FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2018

The official opening ceremony of the FIDE World Chess Championship Match 2018 was held on November 8th at a prestigious red-carpet event at the iconic Victoria & Albert Museum in London, UK.

VA0004

VA0067

Guests from all over the world, including Woody Harrelson, Hou Yifan, Judit Polgar descended onto London for the glittering evening, hosted by British television presenter, George Lamb. Entertainment included a modern contemporary dance between two men featuring the unity and struggle of two strong characters, like in the game of chess, and a breath-taking performance by the talented Stephen Ridley – a young charismatic pianist, composer and singer.

VA0063

The highlight of the evening was the introduction of the competitors, Magnus Carlsen of Norway and Fabiano Caruana of USA. The Chief Arbiter of the Match Stepahne Escafre conducted the ceremony of the drawing of lots. Magnus Carlsen will have the black pieces in the first game. The first move of the World Chess Championship match will be played on November 9th, at 3 pm local time.

VA0057

VA0050

President of FIDE, Arkady Dvorkovich, CEO of World Chess, Ilya Merenzon, as well as Vice President and Member of the Board of Trustees of the Russian Chess Federation, CEO of PhosAgro, Andrey Guryev, Head of Global Partnerships and Sponsorships at Kaspersky Lab, Aldo del Bo, CEO of S.T. Dupont, Alain Crevet joined the players on the stage.

Taking place from 9-28 November, the world’s most esteemed chess tournament consists of a 12-game Match, avidly followed and analysed by a global audience of hundreds of millions of chess fans, which will see current World Chess Champion, Norway’s Magnus Carlsen, defend his title against US challenger, Fabiano Carlsen. No player born in the United States has won or even competed for a World Championship since Bobby Fischer in 1972, so all eyes will be on the two players. Those following the games online will also be catered for; they will be able to watch the moves for free on , the official broadcasting platform. They can also sign up for a $20 premium account, giving fans access to multi-camera views, commentary, behind-the-scenes footage, the opportunity to ask questions during press conferences and more.

VA0046

The last World Championship match, held in New York, in 2016, enjoyed record-breaking coverage with the total audience for the whole event topping 1.5 billion people.

Leading partners supporting the Championship Match 2018 include:

PhosAgro, a leading chemical company as the Official Strategic Partner
Kaspersky Lab as World Chess and FIDE’s Official Cybersecurity Partner
PRYTEK as Technology Transfer Partner
S.T. Dupont as Official Writing Instrument
Isklar as the official mineral water of the Championship Match
Unibet as the Official Betting Partner
Beluga as the Official VIP Partner

VA0064


FIDE WCCM Game 6 review: Long, strong, miraculous.

King news logo

Game 6: Long, strong, miraculous.

The World Championship match between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana remains deadlocked with six draws in six games. The lack of decisive results is not through want of trying. The sixth game went to 80 moves and lasted six and a half hours before the players agreed a draw, having eliminated most of the pieces from the board.

AR1X0006
Magnus Carlsen opened with 1e4 (switching from 1 d4 and 1 c4 that we saw in his previous games with the white pieces) and Fabiano played his trusty Petroff. The World Champion played a tricky side line, but the challenger also knew the line well and an equal endgame arose.

king 15
Carlsen-Caruana, position after 21...c5

With his last move, striking against the centre, it was quite clear that the challenger had no difficulties, and at this moment the world champion should have thought about steering the game towards a draw. But Carlsen said that with White 'You always feel like you have more room for error', and he carried out what he described as the classic positional manoeuvre, bringing the bishop round to b3 starting with 22 Bc2.

This was too slow, allowing Caruana to build an attack on the queenside.

king 16
Carlsen-Caruana, position after 29...Nc4

ABC 0478
The position was still tenable for the world champion, but after a further series of inaccuracies, he had to give up a piece in the hope that challenger had too few pawns to force a win.

king 17
Carlsen-Caruana, position after 48 g4

Although White has three pawns for the piece, it is impossible to hold onto them, and the only chance for a draw lay in constructing a fortress on the kingside.

king 18
Carlsen-Caruana, position after 68 Bc4

While the players were spinning their pieces around in circles to no great effect, the Norwegian super computer Sesse announced a mate in 30 moves on a couple of occasions. Here for example, 68...Bh4 is apparently a winning move – but this is way beyond human comprehension, certainly when playing against the clock and after so many hours play.

ABC 0253
Caruana couldn't break down Carlsen's position, and after 80 moves a draw was agreed.

After the game, both players were amazed to learn of the miraculous winning chance. Caruana took it in his stride: 'Near the end, I thought it was a fortress...it was a bit of an accidental.

ABC 0223
We are now half-way through the match: 12 classical games are scheduled, and it is still too close to call.

(Daniel King)





Game 5: Thrust and Parry

Round 5 1
The fifth game of the World Championship match had an exciting start, but burnt out to a draw after 34 moves.

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales made the ceremonial opening move for Fabiano Caruana, and the American challenger used encyclopaedic opening knowledge to offer a gambit pawn to Magnus Carlsen in a rare line of the Rossolimo variation of the Sicilian. The world champion took his time at first, clearly adjusting to the unusual circumstances, but the confident way in which he dealt with this attempted opening ambush leads one to suspect that he was merely recollecting analysis.

King 8
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 6 b4)

Round 5 4
That's the little explosion that Caruana had prepared. In fact the idea is quite old (curiously, the assistant arbiter at the match, Nana Alexandria, had played this in the Soviet women's championship in 1969) and Carlsen himself had faced the gambit when still a teenager in 2005. Then he had played 6...cxb4. Today he went for the more unusual 6...Nxb4, suggesting that he too had researched this line.

King 9
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 10 Bxa1)

Back in 1969, Alexandria's opponent had taken on b4, allowing the e5 pawn to be captured. Carlsen's response, 10...d6, was stronger, holding his centre together. Caruana rejected a line that would have given him a symbolic structural advantage and tested his opponent with a new move.

King 10
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 12 Qe2)

The position is tricky, but Carlsen deftly handled the complications with 12...b4 13 Qc4 Qa5 14 exd6 Be6!

King 11
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 14...Be6)

Caruana had to go into the endgame with 15 Qc7, and that spelled the end of White's initiative.

King 12
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 21...Rd8)

Although the challenger has an extra pawn, in fact he has to be careful as Carlsen threatens the pawns on b4 and d3. However, an accurately calculated sequence of checks liquidated pieces, activated his rook and removed any thoughts of Carlsen trying to win the game.

King 13
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 29 Kf1)

White's rook on the seventh rank ties down the knight and guarantees the draw. Carlsen took no chances, withdrawing his king from a slightly vulnerable position, but in the process returning the extra pawn.

King 14
Caruana-Carlsen (position after 34 g4+)

Here Caruana offered a draw, and there was no reason for Carlsen to decline.

Round 5 2
Afterwards the challenger said that, 'This line is really interesting and if Black is cooperative it can also get very exciting, but Magnus knew the line quite well and I think played in a very logical way'. While admitting that the endgame wasn't much fun, 'I never thought I was worse'.

Carlsen thought that only he could be better in the endgame, but couldn't find a way to push for a win. 'If there is a way at all to play for the advantage, the path is very narrow.'

After five games – five draws. It's still all square in the match. Carlsen now plays with two white's over the next two games which gives him a chance to put pressure on the challenger.

(Daniel King)






Game 4: Correct on the board, but a blunder off

The fourth game of the world chess championship match between Magnus Carlsen and Fabio Caruana was drawn in 34 moves. The challenger played with the black pieces and had little difficulty in neutralising the world champion's initiative - which was a source of frustration to Carlsen: 'It was a bit disappointing, I thought I was clearly better after the opening'.

King PIC 4

The challenger, Caruana, certainly seemed happier with his play after the game. 'I never really felt that my position was in much danger.'

Carlsen opened with 1 c4 – a different first move to his previous game with the white pieces and the game went into a kind of reversed Sicilian.

King 5 (position after 6...Bc5)

Bringing out the bishop is the fashionable way of playing the position (6...Nb6 is the standard move) and Caruana has some experience of this line with both colours.

Perhaps the most important moment of the game came after 14 moves when Carlsen had to make a big strategic decision.

King 6 (position after 14...c6)

The logical continuation of White's play is to push forward with the minority pawn attack, 15 b5, but the world champion was dissatisfied with this option: 'I spent a lot of time here...but it didn't seem to work very well.'

Then again, he also wasn't entirely happy with his move 15 Re1, allowing Caruana to play 15...Bd7 preventing White's pawn break.

Carlsen admitted, 'When I'm allowing ...Bd7 it's half a draw offer. After that the position is very dry and very equal.'

Piece exchanges quickly led into an endgame in which neither side managed to break into the other's position.

'I felt the ending was more or less balanced from the beginning' (Caruana).

King 7(position after 34 Rbc1)

Here Carlsen offered a draw which was accepted by Caruana. Black could take the pawn on b4 and the position would liquidate into a drawn rook and pawn endgame.

Perhaps the most startling news of the day was that St Louis Chess Club, a supporter of Fabiano Caruana, had posted a video of the challenger's training camp showing a computer screen with opening lines under consideration. Although the video was quickly removed, the information was already in the public domain.

After the game, Fabiano Caruana declined to comment on the matter. It remains to be seen whether the incident proves to be a distraction or just an embarrassment.

Four games played, and four draws made. Wednesday is a rest day. Game 5 will be played on Thursday 15th November at 15.00 in London.





Game 3: A Missed Opportunity and Sturdy Defence

The third game of the world championship match between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana ended in a draw after 49 moves. At first glance this seemed like a pacific affair, but there was plenty going on beneath the surface and in the press conference neither player was particularly satisfied with their play.

King PIC 1
Against the challenger's 1 e4, Carlsen repeated the opening of the first day, a Sicilian, and once again the Rossolimo variation appeared on the board. Fabiano Caruana was the first to deviate from game 1, castling on the sixth move rather than playing 6 h3.

1
(position after 6 0-0)

Magnus appeared unphased and continued quickly with the subtle 6...Qc7, not committing his kingside pieces. The first really big decision came at move 9 when Carlsen offered a pawn.

2
(position after 9...0-0)

Perhaps concerned about a quick kingside initiative, Caruana declined the pawn sacrifice and continued to develop steadily. In stark contrast to game 1, play was concentrated on the queenside, well away from the players' kings. This was turning into a heavy-weight strategic struggle.

In order to speed up his development and coordinate his pieces, Carlsen decided to simplify the position, exchanging pieces and pawns. With hindsight this might not have been the best decision, although Caruana had just one moment to exploit the shortcomings in Black's position.

3
(position after 14...Rxa5)

Here, the challenger could have played 15 Rxa5 Qxa5 16 Bd2 Qc7 17 Qa1, and White's control of files on the queenside and his compact pawn structure would give him a pleasant basis on which to conduct the middlegame.

Instead, he played 15 Bd2, overlooking that the rook could simply return,15...Raa8, and Black keeps control over the files on the queenside. 'It was a bit of a blackout', admitted Caruana after the game.

The challenger appreciated that he had no advantage and decided to exchange pieces bringing the game closer to a draw. But he had under-estimated Carlsen's position.

4
(position after 37 Kd1)

Carlsen was pressing all over the board, using his slight space advantage – as we have seem him do on so many occasions in the past.

Caruana showed his best qualities at this moment, not panicking, but trusting in the solidity of his position, and he expertly steered the game towards a draw by exchanging pawns and then giving up his knight to reach a theoretically drawn position.

5
(position after 49 exf5)

White's king steps into the corner on h1, and it is impossible to drive it away.

When asked after the game whether he was satisified with the outcome of the opening, Carlsen laconically replied 'Nope', and went on to describe how the position would have been unpleasant to play if Caruana had found the right continuation.

After three games the match score is still even, game 4 takes place on Tuesday at 15.00 in London.
 

Game 2 of the World Chess Championship match between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana was drawn in 49 moves.

Carlsen started the game solidly by playing 1 d4. A Queen's Gambit Declined appeared on the board with the World Champion trying out the complex Bf4 variation. Fabiano Caruana played an unusual line and was clearly more familiar with the opening as Carlsen consumed valuable time at the board. After Carlsen's 17th move Caruana still had 1 hour and 32 minutes on the clock while Carlsen had just 39 minutes. At that point the World Champion decided to compromise, allowing exchanges that left a simpler and drier position on the board. Although Carlsen had the slightly inferior position, he held the ensuing endgame comfortably.

King PIC 2
The first surprise came for Carlsen with 10...Rd8.

King 1
Caruana explained afterwards that this is an old move that has fallen out of fashion: 'I was kind of excited to try this out'.

Magnus admitted in the press conference that his main thought on seeing this move was 'Oh s**t!'

The critical response is 11 Nd2, but fearing some deep preparation, Carlsen preferred unpretentious development with 11 Be2. His position was quite playable, but he underestimated a couple of Caruana's moves, fell behind on the clock, and that influenced his decision when it came to the critical juncture at move 17.

King 2

Here Carlsen had the chance to make a temporary piece sacrifice with 17 Nxf7, leading to highly complex positions. But given that Caruana was probably still following a prepared line, the World Champion decided to err on the side of caution.

'I thought at this point there was way better equity in playing it safe and trying to secure a draw' - Carlsen.

Caruana confirmed that he was still in his opening preparation: 'I knew this position was okay for Black...'

After Carlsen's safe move, pieces were exchanged, ultimately leading to a rook and pawn endgame where Caruana had an extra pawn, but no real winning chances and a draw was quickly agreed after three hours play.

After two games the match score remains level. The third game takes place on Monday at 15.00 in London.





List of Decisions of Q4 2018 Presidential Board

official logo


2018 4th quarter
Presidential Board
8-10 November 2018
London, UK


LIST OF Q4 2018 PRESIDENTIAL BOARD DECISIONS

Q4PB-2018/01 To approve the opening of a FIDE office in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Q4PB-2018/02 To approve the 2019 FIDE budget and to grant the President and the Treasurer the right to re-allocate budget expenses by joint decisions.

Q4PB-2018/03 To request the next GA to amend Financial Regulations regarding the reduction of fees charged by FIDE, as proposed by the President.

Q4PB-2018/04 To allow the FIDE President to sign any documents which financially engage FIDE for any amount of under 50,000 Euros.

Q4PB-2018/05 To approve the proposal to perform detailed repeat audits for four (4) years and to upgrade FIDE accounting practices in compliance with the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS).

Q4PB-2018/06 To research the purchase of liability insurance for FIDE Directors and Officers (D&O) and report to the next PB.

Q4PB-2018/07 To approve an amendment that allows to appoint Ashot Vardapetyan the FIDE Supervisor for the 2018 World Championship Match.

Q4PB-2018/08 To confirm that the FIDE President has an absolute authority to hire and dismiss FIDE employees who are not FIDE officials.

Q4PB-2018/09 To appoint Arkady Dvorkovich and Emil Sutovsky as new members of the FIDE-World Chess Interface.

Q4PB-2018/10 To approve Willy Iclicki as a new Legal Representative in order to represent FIDE with a Greek bank and the Greek authorities.

Q4PB-2018/11 To approve that FIDE will only claim a 250 Euro notification fee and will waive a transfer fee in the transfer of A. Shirov to the Spanish federation.

Q4PB-2018/12 To approve the exclusion of K. Uladzislau from the rating list under Belarus, with a stipulation that he can apply to become a member of any other federation.

Q4PB-2018/13 To approve the model Agreement concerning the Assistance provided by FIDE for the Development of Chess.

Q4PB-2018/14 To approve a system wherein members of the Presidential Board and other FIDE employees as appointed by the President would monitor the implementation of Agreements signed with specific groups of countries.

Q4PB-2018/15 To review a procedure regarding the approval of new FIDE membership, and to request that all federations submit their statutes to FIDE.

Q4PB-2018/16 To approve amendments regarding future Presidential Board meetings, including the President’s right to define a meeting schedule, rules for submitting proposals to PB, a possibility to hold meetings by means of tele- and video conferencing, and to take decisions by remote voting.

Q4PB-2018/17 To approve а request from the Portuguese-speaking Federations Association тo become an affiliated member of FIDE and to recommend to the GA to approve the request.

Q4PB-2018/19 То confirm that any member of the FIDE commissions can be appointed only upon an approval by the FIDE President.

Q4PB-2018/19 To give the FIDE President the authority to dismiss any commission member. Such dismissal shall be done in consultation with a Commission Chairman or Continental President if a member was appointed in the same way.

Q4PB-2018/20 To refer to the General Assembly a proposal that all members of elected commissions (CON, ETH, VER) shall obtain endorsements from their national federations.

Q4PB-2018/21 To approve the decision which requires the FIDE President to establish a paid task force for review of all FIDE regulations that would work on a permanent basis to check completeness and consistency of all FIDE docs.

Q4PB-2018/22 To create the Global Strategy Commission and to acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Mr. Emil Sutovsky as chairman.

Q4PB-2018/23 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Ozgur Solakoglu as chairman of Events Commission.

Q4PB-2018/24 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Smbat Lputian as chairman of Chess in Education Commission.

Q4PB-2018/25 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Eva Repkova as chairwoman of Women’s Chess Commission.

Q4PB-2018/26 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Thomas Luther as chairman of Disabled Commission.

Q4PB-2018/27 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Mahdi Abdulrahim as the chairman of Rule Commission.

Q4PB-2018/28 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Maciej Cybulski as chairman of System of Pairings and Programs.

Q4PB-2018/29 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Nick Faulks as chairman of Qualification Commission.

Q4PB-2018/30 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Bharat Singh as chairman of Technical Commission.

Q4PB-2018/31 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Ilya Gorodetsky as chairman of Online Commission.

Q4PB-2018/32 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Jacob Aagard as chairman of Trainers’ Commission.

Q4PB-2018/33 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Marape Marape as chairman of Medical Commission.

Q4PB-2018/34 To approve the creation of Honorary Commission Chairman positions and to acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Takis Nikolopoulos, Adrian Mikhalchishin, Werner Stubenvoll and Ashot Vardapetyan as Honorary Chairman of ARB, TRG, QC and RC, respectively.

Q4PB-2018/35 To confirm the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Victor Bologan as the FIDE Executive Director.

Q4PB-2018/36 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Emil Sutovsky as the FIDE Director General.

Q4PB-2018/37 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Willy Iclicki as the FIDE Chief Operating Officer.

Q4PB-2018/38 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Mohd Al-Mudahka as the FIDE International Director.

Q4PB-2018/39 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Berik Balgabaev as the Advisor to the FIDE President.

Q4PB-2018/40 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to appoint Aleksandr Martynov as the Legal Advisor.

Q4PB-2018/41 To acknowledge the FIDE President’s decision to create the FIDE Management Board that would combine all key members of the Executive. The list of MB members appointed by the President is attached.

Q4PB-2018/42 To approve the title recommendations by the following commissions: QC, ARB, CIS, TEC and EVE.

Q4PB-2018/43 To confirm the President’s authority to make a final decision about the four wildcards to be given at the next FIDE World Chess Cup.

Q4PB-2018/44 To approve the increase in the minimal prize fund in Women’s World Championship Match from 300,000 to 500,000 Euros.

Q4PB-2018/45 To approve the new regulations for the 2019 Women’s Candidates tournament including a decision to have no wildcards.

Q4PB-2018/46 To improve the FIDE Calendar in order to avoid clashes between tournaments.

Q4PB-2018/47 To confirm the President’s authority to appoint members of the Presidential Board and any other FIDE employees at his sole discretion as FIDE supervisors to monitor and report on all aspects of the FIDE Calendar tournaments.

Q4PB-2018/48 To postpone the decision regarding the Ivory Coast Chess Federation’s dispute until the decision of local court is received.

Q4PB-2018/49 To acknowledge the President’s report on the status of the FIDE World Rapid and Blitz Championship 2018 and FIDE Women’s World Rapid and Blitz Championship 2018.

Q4PB-2018/50 To settle the CAS case between Kirsan Ilyumzhinov and FIDE as soon as possible.

Q4PB-2018/51 To appoint Mohd Al-Mudahka and Emil Sutovsky as the FIDE representatives for IMSA.

Q4PB-2018/52 To appoint Willy Iclicki as the FIDE Liaison to the World Chess Hall of Fame.

Q4PB-2018/53 To introduce and execute a non-disclosure agreement for PB members, Executive Directors and other FIDE staff.

Q4PB-2018/54 To maintain the FIDE Office in Moscow in perpetuity while attempting to minimize FIDE expenses.

Q4PB-2018/55 To investigate the reports of organizers’ shortcomings at the 2018 World Cadets Chess Championships in Spain and to review the decision to award the 2019 World Youth Rapid and Blitz U14/U16/U18 Championships to Spain once such investigation is completed.

Q4PB-2018/56 To approve the use of a specific expense reimbursement claim form in order to help the Treasurer, the accountants, and the office.







World Cadet Chess Championships 2018 finished in Spain

World Cadet Chmp 2018


The World Cadet Chess Championships finished in Spain

The World Cadet Chess Championships 2018 were held in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain, from 3rd of November to 15th of November 2018.

The Championships were held for the age groups U08, U10 and U12, Girls and Open. A record number of 851 participants from 86 federations took part in the Championships. There are 542 players in open section and 309 players in girls' section.

The final results

U08 Open
1 Chennareddy, Yuvraj USA 10.5
2 Azadaliyev, Jahandar AZE 9.0
3 Begmuratov, Khumoyun UZB 8.5

U08 Girls
1 Zhao, Yunqing CHN 9.5
2 Iudina, Veronika RUS 9.0
3 Qiao, Evelyn USA 8.5

U10 Open
1 Jin Yueheng CHN 9.0
2 Zhao, Erick USA 9.0
3 Volkov, Maksim RUS 8.5

U10 Girls
1 Edithso, Samantha INA 9.0
2 Shvedova, Alexandra RUS 8.5
3 Chen, Yining CHN 8.5

U12 Open
1 Gukesh D IND 10.0
2 Murzin, Volodar RUS 8.5
3 Chasin, Nico USA 8.5

U12 Girls
1 Savitha Shri B IND 10.0
2 Omonova, Umida UZB 9.5
3 Zavivaeva, Emilia RUS 8.0

round11 1
round11 2

round11 3
round11 4





World Cadet Chess Championships 2018: Round 8


The 8th round of the FIDE World Cadets Chess Championships took place in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain on November 12. The championships are reaching their final stage and the fate of the medals will be decided in the last critical rounds.

wccc round8

Yuvraj Chennareddy from the USA attained a perfect score and is the sole leader with 8/8 in U-08 Open category. Three players: Jahandar Azadaliyev from Uzbekistan, Lu Miaoyi from China and Chen Ryo from Japan are 1.5 points behind him.

Wiktoria Smietanska from Poland shares the lead with Veronika Iudina from Russia with 7/8 in U-08 Girls category. Zhao Yunqing from China has 6,5/8 and is in the third place.

Maksim Volkov from Russia, Jin Yueheng from China and Dang Anh Minh from Vietnam have 7/8 and share the first place in U-10 Open championship. Four players are just half a point behind them.

The current world rapid chess champion U-10 and the member of the national team, Samantha Edithso from Indonesia shares lead with Zhou Yafei from China in U-10 Girls Category. Alexandra Shvedova is half a point behind them.

The rating favorite D Gukesh from India leads with a perfect score 8/8 in U-12 Open Category and his nearest rivals Jason Wang from the USA, Volodar Murzin from Russia, Shen Shiyan from China and Han Yichen from the Netherlands are one and a half points behind.

Savitha Shri B from India is the sole leader with 7,5/8 in U-12 Girls category. Umida Omonova from Uzbekistan is in the second place with 7/8, while Julia Volovich from England is in the third place with 6.5/8.


All results are here  




World Cadet Chess Championships 2018: Round 3


The 3rd round of the FIDE World Cadets in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain was held on November 7. The round was supposed to be played on November 6 but it has been postponed due to bad weather conditions.

DSC 0194

The World Cadet Chess Championships 2018 are held in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain, from 3rd of November (arrivals, technical meeting) to 16th of November 2018 (departures).

calendario-rectificado-1-463x1024

All results are here  




World Cadet Chess Championships 2018: Round 2

The second round of the World Cadet Chess Championship U-8, U-10 and U-12 was played in Santiago de Compostela, Spain on November 5.

The World Cadet Chess Championships 2018 are held in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain, from 3rd of November (arrivals, technical meeting) to 16th of November 2018 (departures).

DSC 0090

The Championships are held for the age groups U8, U10 and U12, Girls and Open.

A record number of 851 participants from 86 federations will be taking part in the Championships. There are 542 players in open section and 309 players in girls' section.

All results are here



The World Cadet Chess Championships 2018 started in Santiago de Compostela, Spain

The first round of the World Cadet Chess Championship started with the first symbolic move, made by Sports Director of the Galicia province Ms Martiño Noriega, Mayor of Santiago de Compostela Mr Martiño Noriega Sánchez and Sports Director of Galicia Marta Miguez in the presence of the President of the Spanish chess federation Javier Ochoa, FIDE Executive Board members Ozgur Solakoglu and Sainbayar Tserendorj on October 4th.

The technical meeting was held on the 3rd November at Cidade de Culture. The Chief Arbiter of the World Youth Championships Takis Nikolopoulos drew the attention of the players to some tournament regulations, anti-cheating measures and reminded them about the tournament schedule.

DSC 0029

The World Cadet Chess Championships 2018 are held in Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain, from 3rd of November (arrivals, technical meeting) to 16th of November 2018 (departures).

The Championships are held for the age groups U8, U10 and U12, Girls and Open. The national champions of federations members of FIDE in each of the age groups are granted free accommodation by the Organizer.

A record number of 851 participants from 86 federations will be taking part in the Championships. There are 542 players in open section and 309 players in girls' section.

DSC 0248

The tournament will be played using the Swiss System with 11 rounds. The rate of play will be in accordance with the FIDE rules: 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with an addition of 30 seconds per move starting from move one. The default time is 30 minutes.

Three best Federations, by the ranking of medals collected in all categories, will receive a trophy. For first place the number of gold medals will be taken under consideration, if there is a tie, then the number of silver medals, if there is still a tie, then the number of bronze medals. If finally, this is still equal, then the total points of medalists will be taken for a tiebreak.

DSC 0075

Top three places in each tournament will be awarded cups and medals. Places 4th to 6th with medals. Two youngest participants in Open and Girls will receive gifts.

All players will be given certificates of participation.

Official website

DSC 0206

DSC 0237

DSC 0056

Bidding procedure for the FIDE Women’s Candidates Tournament 2019

official logo

BIDDING PROCEDURE FOR THE FIDE WOMEN’S CANDIDATES TOURNAMENT 2019

1. FIDE is opening a bidding procedure for the FIDE Women’s Candidates Tournament 2019

2. Each bid shall contain the following particulars as minimum:

a) Proposed exact place and dates of the event.
b) Proposed tournament venue.
c) Proposed prize fund for the players (minimum 200,000 euros should be offered net of any applicable local taxes).
d) The contribution to FIDE (net of any applicable local taxes and not less than 20% of the prize fund in addition to the prize fund).
e) Commitment to cover all financial obligations to FIDE, including all the stipends.
f) Commitment to cover all organizational costs, in accordance with the regulations of the event.
g) Category of official hotel (minimum 4 stars), and its name, with special room rates including meals.
h) A statement that the applicant accepts the regulations of the event without any reservations.
i) An invitation for at least two members of the GSC to inspect the proposed venue and examine the other conditions, with all travel and hotel expenses paid by the bidder.
j) The applicant's name, signatures and authentication
k) Letters of support from the national federation and relevant local authorities.

3. A bid is considered valid if it is accompanied with a non-refundable Bid Fee of 1,000 euros payable to FIDE.

4. With effect from 1st January 2013, a bid for any FIDE Competitions onwards shall include the name of a FIDE licensed International Organizer.

5. All bids should be submitted by the due date in sealed envelope or scanned documents to the FIDE Secretariat, postal address: 9 Syggrou Avenue, 11743 Athens - Greece / Fax: (+30) 2109212859 / Email: office@fide.com by 15th December 2018, 16:00 local time (UTC/GMT + 2 hours).

Rules for the FIDE Women’s Candidates Tournament 2019

official logo


FIDE is announcing the Rules for the FIDE Women’s Candidates Tournament 2019.

The Rules for the FIDE Women’s Candidates Tournament 2019 can be downloaded .







2018 4th quarter Presidential Board Meeting

official logo

2018 4th quarter Presidential Board meeting was held in London November 8-9.

The FIDE President Arkady Dvorkovich reported to the board on how he started his mandate by visiting differents tournaments. The President announced that new FIDE bank account will be opened in Switzerland. The FIDE headquarters will be established in Lausanne.

Faithful to the compaign promises of bringing FIDE to new standard and level, a budget for 2019 of 5.546.000 Euros was presented and adopted with 3.000.000 Euros allocated to the development.

On administrative matters, GM Victor Bologan has been appointed Executive Director. A Management Board has been set up with Mr. Emil Sutovsky as Director General, Mr. Willy Iclicki as Chief Operational Officer, Mr. Igor Kogan as Deputy Chairman, Mr. Mohd Al-Mudahka as International Director, Mr. Alexander Martynov as Lawyer, Mr. Vadim Tsypin as Secretary.

The Presidential Board approved the restructuration of the non-elected commissions which will be eighteen with a maximum of ten members per commission and the appointment of most of the chairmen. Titles from the Arbiters, Trainers and Events commissions were approved.

The Presidential Board approved the regulations and modalities of FIDE development assistance to national federations and pilot agreements have been signed between FIDE and four federations, one from each continent: Trinidad and Tobago, San Marino, Mongolia and Eswatini.

Reports of the 2018 Chess Olympiad and of the four continents were presented to the Presidential Board.

 8049006
 8050135
Photos by Fiona Steil-Antoni

List of titles approved by the 2018 4th quarter PB in London, UK

official logo

FIDE publishes the list of titles approved by the 2018 4th quarter Presidential Board in London, UK November 8 - 9.

GM FED
Cori Quispe, Kevin Joel PER
Gonzalez Perez, Arian FID
   
WGM  
Uuriintuya, Uurtsaikh MGL
   
IM  
Pasko, Llambi ALB
Szotkowski, Jakub CZE
Engel, Luis GER
   
WIM  
Bayarmaa, Bayarjargal MGL
   
IA  
Duran, Juan ARG
Wang, Xinyue CHN
Lemoine, Thomas FRA
Japaridze, Davit GEO
Nikoladze, Sopio GEO
Karimi Alavijeh, Mozhgan IRI
Seyed Tarrah, Sona IRI
Oliyo, Ilaria ITA
Yildirim, Cuneyt Kamil TUR
Jimenez Puerta, Orlando Emisael VEN
   
FA  
Leka, Bernard ALB
Yang, Hanxiong CHN
Howell, Chris I ENG
Wickenfeld, Stefan GER
Brigati, Alessandro ITA
Bauyrzahn, Kaussar KAZ
Ishaq, Alanoud KSA
Shemshiji, Agim MKD
Cunanan, Marlon PHI
Kusarankul, Wasinee THA
Yagoubi, Hassen TUN
Percin, Yadigar TUR
   
IO  
Chanturia, Giorgi GEO
Giorgadze, Giorgi GEO
Mikadze, Zurab GEO
Wilkinson, Ian GEO
Lindo, Terence JAM
   
CONDITIONAL ON RATING  
GM  
Egglestone, David ENG
Notkevich, Benjamin Arvola NOR
   
IM  
Tiba, Vladyslav UKR
Yu, Jennifer USA
   
CONDITIONAL ON INFO  
IA  
Gjergii, Rozanna ALB
   
FA  
Ayyildiz, Bugra TUR
Gunay, Bedrettin TUR


Download the from Seminars approved by the PB.

The 28th World Senior Championship 2018

logo

The 28th World Senior Championship will take place in Bled, Slovenia from November 17 (arrivals) through November 30, 2018 (departures). The tournament venue will be the Congress Centre in Grand Hotel Toplice Bled 5*****. Bled is a place which is well-known to all chess fans since the city hosted the 35th World Chess Olympiad in 2002. At present, 340 players from 59 different countries and all continents are registered. There are 33 Grandmasters and Women Grandmasters among them.

The tournament will be played as a 11-round Swiss. The time control is 90 minutes for the first 40 moves followed by 30 minutes for the rest of the game with a 30-second increment per move starting from move one.

Schedule
schedule

The total prize fund is 18.000 EUR

prizemoney



Bled